Home Lifestyle Fashion Captain Tom has launched his own London Dry gin for £35.95

Captain Tom has launched his own London Dry gin for £35.95


Many will be reaching for an extra tipple over the festive period, but now they can do so for a good cause, as Captain Sir Tom Moore has launched his own brand of gin with the proceeds going to charity.

The World War 2 veteran, 100, has partnered with the Otterbeck Distillery in his native Yorkshire to create a drink which costs  £35.95 for a 70cl bottle.

All the proceeds from the spirit go to The Captain Tom Moore foundation, which helps charities including Mind and The British Legion.

Captain Sir Tom Moore, 100, has partnered with the Otterbeck Distillery in his native Yorkshire to create a drink which costs £35.95 for a 70cl bottle

The drink is described as  a ‘delicate and herbaceous London dry with soft hints of citrus, rosemary and thyme. Fresh and aromatic reminiscent of an English Summer Garden’.

Sir Tom first met twelve-time Motorcycle Trials World Champion, and co-owner of Otterbeck Distillery, Dougie Lampkin whilst making the ITV film, ‘A Day in the life of Captain Tom.’ 

They discovered a mutual passion for the Yorkshire Dales and Vintage Motorbikes and a great friendship was made. 

The war veteran was keen to see Dougie’s collection of bikes at his home and whilst there took the chance to visit the Distillery, founded by Dougie, his wife Nicola and friends. 

Captain Sir Tom joked he’d like to have his own gin one day – and after many a taste test and reminiscence about his childhood growing up in Yorkshire, Sir Tom’s gin was borne: a gin to celebrate family and friendships. 

, Daily Echoed

The drink is described as a ‘delicate and herbaceous London dry with soft hints of citrus, rosemary and thyme. Fresh and aromatic reminiscent of an English Summer Garden’

Nicola Lampkin, Founder, Otterbeck Distillery told FEMAIL: ‘It is an amazing privilege to be working with Captain Sir Tom and his foundation which supports some incredible charities.

‘We’re delighted to be able to do our bit to help support such worthwhile causes. Captain Sir Tom has captured the imagination of the world and we’re proud to have distilled a very special gin with a very special man.’

Hannah Ingram-Moore, Daughter of Captain Sir Tom added: ‘On behalf of Captain Sir Tom and family we are delighted to be in partnership with Otterbeck Distillery and sincerely look forward to our journey together. 

, Daily Echoed

Captain Sir Tom Moore has revealed his penchant for cooking, revealing he loves to cook oatmeal biscuits and ‘makes a great Sunday roast’.

‘We feel an electric connection to Yorkshire so working with a gin based here is so special to us as we continue to build our family legacy and celebrate our heritage.’ 

In October, his daughter applied for legal protection over the name ‘Captain Tom’  to stop brands cashing in on her father’s new found fame.

Hannah Ingram-Moore, 50, applied to legally protect the phrases Captain Tom and Captain Sir Tom through her company, Club Nook.

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Captain Sir Tom Moore is pictured being knighted by the Queen in July during a ceremony at Windsor 

The Coventry-based firm, which was registered in April, has indicated it plans to use the terms on alcoholic products including beer, wine, vodka, sherry, brandy and rum.

The trademark application, filed on August 20, also covers soft drinks including cordials, fruit drinks and mocktails.  

It comes as the former army officer  revealed his penchant for cooking, saying he loves to cook oatmeal biscuits and ‘makes a great Sunday roast’.

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The World War Two veteran, who was knighted after raising money by walking laps of his Bedfordshire garden in April, said he keeps his strength up with a ‘big bowl of porridge every morning, which he has ‘done all of his life, as far back as he can remember

From Yorkshire to India: Colonel Tom Moore’s career in the military

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Colonel Tom pictured during the Second World War. Boris Johnson described him as a national treasure during the Covid-19 crisis after raising almost £33million for the NHS

Captain Tom Moore was conscripted into the British Army in June 1940 when he was 20, alongside all men aged 20 to 35.  

He began his military career in Otley, West Yorkshire, where he joined the 8th Battalion, the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment under Lieutenant Lord George Saville.

The Regiment was sent to train in Wadebridge, Cornwall where they were tasked with coastal defence amid a predicted German invasion.

A young Captain Moore was soon promoted to Corporal and sent to the officer cadet training unit in Droitwich Spa.

Here, he celebrated his 21st birthday after he passed as a Second Lieutenant.

In August 1941, he was sent to the DWR headquarters in Halifax where he joined the 9th Battalion at Winchcombe.  

The infantry battalion then converted to an armoured regiment 146th Royal Armoured Corp, though the majority of the soldiers could not drive.

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Captain Moore is pictured front centre during his days in the Army. He joined the Armed Forces in 1940 when he was aged 20

In October, the unit was posted to Bombay, now Mumbai, in India. The journey took six weeks by sea, with a four-day delay in Freetown, Sierra Leone and a four-day stop in Cape Town.

Captain Moore then took a train from Bombay to Poona, before arriving at Kirkee, a town now known as Khadki.

The 9th DWR formed the 50th Indian Tank Brigade under the command of Brigadier Schreiber.

Captain Moore was then asked by the Brigadier to start a motorcycling course for the Brigade due to his expertise for the sport.    

The Brigade was then ordered to move to Calcutta – the road journey was in a monsoon and took three weeks. 

His Battalion was stationed in the Lohardaga district near Ranchi.

They then took part in two exercises in the Arakan before moving further east and south to Rangoon.

Captain Moore was then sent on a course at the approved vehicle depot in Bovington, England.

He remained here as an instructor until it was closed. 

The centenarian,  who won the  hearts of the nation by raising more than £30million for the NHS ahead of his 100th birthday, spoke to Waitrose Food magazine’s December issues about his culinary process. 

The Bedfordshire-based national hero added that his mother taught him to cook, and he loves tapas and Chinese food at home and despite his Yorkshire roots he enjoys weak tea with plenty of milk and sugar.

‘My mother taught me [to cook],’ he explained.

‘She was an excellent baker and cook. Every Sunday we’d have roast beef and potatoes, and having watched her do it so often, I could also do it. I can make a good Sunday lunch. 

‘We used to make some very nice oatmeal biscuits, some with sugar and some without that you could eat with cheese. 

‘I was always quite popular when I made biscuits,’ he added.   

Sit Tom was knighted after raising money by walking laps of his garden in April. 

He said he keeps his strength up with a ‘big bowl of porridge every morning, which he has ‘done all of his life, as far back as he can remember.

‘When I was a boy, my favourite was sausages and mash. Now I really like steak and chips with Yorkshire pudding and plenty of gravy. I still enjoy my food very much.

He added his best meal ever came when his family was on holiday in Southport in 1931.

 ‘I had sausages and mash at a restaurant and it was lovely. I still remember it now!’

He added that he was ‘very fortunate’ to be surrounded by ‘good cooks’  and ‘decent quality’ food while he was in the army, and he’s since picked up a penchant for tapas after serving in Spain.  

‘I spent four years in Spain and I thoroughly enjoyed tapas, eating a little bit here and there. 

‘You didn’t seem to get charged for it, and it was very good. 

‘But my favourite now is Chinese food, especially chicken with pineapple and egg-fried rice.   

And while he has a taste for exotic food, the former Blankety Blank contestant, who was born in Yorkshire, doesn’t enjoy a strong brew. 

‘I don’t really like strong Yorkshire-style tea, even though I’m from Yorkshire. I like fairly weak tea with plenty of milk and some sugar. 

Discussing his typical Christmas, Sir Tom added: ‘We usually have a gathering at my house, with a big turkey and all the things that go with it. 

‘There’s enough food left to eat for a day or two afterwards. We always have trifle, which I’m quite good at making because I put plenty of sherry in it. And lots and lots of thick cream on top. It never lasts long.

‘I like plum pudding, lit up with brandy. When I was small, there were always threepenny or sixpenny pieces in the pudding, for luck.  

‘My favourite drink is a John Collins cocktail. I don’t think it does any harm and it’s made of very nice things, like gin and lemon.

‘I first had it when I was in India. Any time you see me, I’m quite happy to have a John Collins with you!’ he added. 



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