Home Science & Cosmos Psychedelic mushrooms are found growing in man's vein after he injected them...

Psychedelic mushrooms are found growing in man’s vein after he injected them to treat depression 


A ‘trip’ to the ER: Psychedelic mushrooms are found growing in man’s vein after he injected them to treat his ongoing battle with depression

  • A man, 30, was rushed to the ER after injecting himself with magic mushrooms 
  • ‘Mr. X,’ as the report states, boiled the mushrooms to make a tea
  • He then injected the filter substance and a number of aliments followed
  • Mr. X experience organ failure, septic shock and contracted a fungal infection 
  • The fungus was found to be feeding on him and growing in his blood 
  • Mr. X reportedly has bipolar disorder and an opioid dependency  

A 30-year-old man was rushed to the emergency room after injecting himself with a ‘tea’ made from magic mushrooms, which resulted in fungi growing in his blood.

The case, reported by scientists from Creighton University School of Medicine, is regarding ‘Mr. X,’ who suffers with bipolar disorder and depression , along with a history of opioid dependency – and in a desperate move to self-medicate, he nearly killed himself. 

Mr. X boiled hallucinogenic psilocybin mushrooms into a ‘mushroom tea’ and filtered the concoction by drawing it through a cotton swab before directly injecting the liquid intravenously.

After several days, Mr. X was rushed to the emergency room where medical staff found he had bacterial and fungal infections that caused  Psilocybe cubensis, the species of mushroom injected, to grow in his blood.

Scroll down for video 

A 30-year-old man was rushed to the emergency room after injecting himself with a ‘tea’ made from magic mushrooms (stock) that resulted in fungi growing in his blood. The man, 30, made a tea with the mushrooms that he injected 

‘History gathered from his family was remarkable for recent non-adherence with his prescribed psychotropics (risperidone and valproate) and subsequent cycling between depressive and manic states,’ reads the report published in the Journal of the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry as a pre-proof paper.

‘He had reportedly been researching ways to self-treat his opioid dependence and depression. In his reading he encountered reports of therapeutic effects of micro-dosing LSD and hallucinogenic psilocybin mushrooms prompting him to inject what he had named ‘mushroom tea.’

Previous studies have shown that taking small doses of a compound found in magic mushrooms can reduce feelings of depression, but Mr. X took these findings to the next level.

Several days after injecting himself with the mushroom tea, he started to develop lethargy, jaundice, diarrhea, nausea and hematemesis.

, Daily Echoed

Cultures of his blood revealed bacteremia and fungemia. The fungemia was cultured as Psilocybe cubensis, which is the species of mushroom injected that was now growing in his blood. Mr. X spent 22 days in the hospital

However, family and friends found him shortly after and took him to the emergency room immediately.

‘Initial exam was remarkable for O2 saturation on room air of 92%, heart rate of 100, and blood pressure of 75/47,’ the report states.

‘He was noted to be ill-appearing with dry mucous membranes, mild cyanosis of the lips and nail beds, and jaundiced skin.’

‘His abdomen was diffusely tender to palpation without rebound or guarding. He was grossly confused and unable to meaningfully participate in an interview.’

A number of laboratory studies were conducted that showed a number of issues including thrombocytopenia, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, hypochloremia, hypocalcemia, acute renal insufficiency and acute liver injury.

Mr. X was then transferred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) after he showed signs of multiple-organ failure, which led to septic shock and acute respiratory failure.

Cultures of his blood revealed bacteremia and fungemia.

The fungemia was cultured as Psilocybe cubensis, which is the species of mushroom injected that was now growing in his blood.

‘He was treated for a total of 22 days in the hospital with eight of them in the ICU,’ reads the report.

‘At the time of writing, he is currently still being treated with a long-term regimen of daptomycin, meropenem, and voriconazole.’

‘The case reported above underscores the need for ongoing public education regarding the dangers attendant to the use of this, and other drugs, in ways other than they are prescribed.’

Half of depression patients given just TWO doses of magic mushroom compound were symptom free a month later 

Taking just two doses of a compound found in magic mushrooms can reduce feelings of depression, a new small study suggests.

Researchers found that two-thirds of patients saw a 71 percent reduction of symptoms such as sadness, pessimism and self-criticalness.

Additionally, four-weeks post-treatment, more than half of participants were considered in remission, meaning they no longer qualified as being depressed. 

The team, from Johns Hopkins Medicine, says the findings provide evidence that magic mushrooms could be a treatment for mental health issues and even help push legalization of the drug. 

, Daily Echoed

A study by Johns Hopkins Medicine found that half of depression patients who took two doses of psilocybin, the compound found in magic mushrooms (above), were considered to be in remission 

In a 2016 study, the team found that psilocybin relieved anxiety and depression among people with life-threatening cancer diagnoses. 

They say these findings suggest the compound may be effective in a much wider population of patients.

‘The magnitude of the effect we saw was about four times larger than what clinical trials have shown for traditional antidepressants on the market,’ said Dr Alan Davis, an adjunct assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 

‘Because most other depression treatments take weeks or months to work and may have undesirable effects, this could be a game changer if these findings hold up in future ‘gold-standard’ placebo-controlled clinical trials.’  



Source by [author_name]

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Must Read

Translate »